Recycled T-shirt Scarf Tutorial

tshirtscarftutorial

I had an hour of free time last night, so I decided to recycle one of Joe’s old t-shirts and make myself a scarf out of it.  This project was fast, easy, and only took me less than an hour start to finish (not counting the paint drying time).

Supply List:  tshirtsupplylist

 

 

 

Tip: Cut off the t-shirt hem and under the arms as directed in the photo above.  Notice how the t-shirt material curls and rolls as you tear?  You will want to paint on the top side, which may mean you turn the shirt inside out before painting

Once the above items were gathered, I laid down the plastic trash bag to protect my kitchen counter and just started painting.  In the photo below, I used some purple, blue and silver metallic fabric paints.  I work very fast, so it took me only 10 minutes to paint the t-shirt.  Note that I used an inexpensive foam paint brush and some fabric paint I had on hand.

tshirtpaintThe painted t-shirt was then taken outside to my garden faucet.  I scrunched up the shirt and lightly soaked it to blend the paint.  I used my fingers to blend any white areas or would simply rub the damp fabric to saturate the t-shirt fabric.  Here is what my painted fabric looks like after wet blending the paint:

paintanddry

Next, I hung up the fabric outside until dry.  Notice that I left the hem on, knowing I would tear it off later.

tshirthang

Tip: Once your fabric is dry, I recommend you heat set it, depending on your brand of fabric paint.  If you are not sure, go ahead and heat set the fabric to prevent color bleed.

The next step is to cut and tear the fabric into strips.  Here is a helpful illustration to show you visually what I plan to do next:

tshirtscarftearingguidecutstrip

I found that by snipping through the side seam first, then tearing until reaching the other side (about an inch away), you could then use the scissors to cut your t-shirt strips to create a long loop.  Here is another visual for you:

tearstrips

 

Here is what your loop will look like:

tshirtstrip1

To make the t-shirt fabric roll nicely, you just need to stretch it gently.  Here is what my finished strips looked like once I bundled them together and used other rolled t-shirt strips to tie them into a lovely scarf:

tshirtscarf3

At this point, you could embellish your scarf, add beads or tie charms to it.  Braiding some of the strips is another option to try. Really, how you finish it off is up to you.  I used the leftover strips to make dangling bits and for added texture.

If you make one, I would love to see it!  My contact info is above.  Hope you enjoyed this free tutorial.  If so, go ahead and leave me a comment.  Regards, Carla

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Feather Practice

I thought I would share a few of my feather quilting practice for anyone needing to learn or improve their feather skills.  I am starting with my freehand feather handout #1 (pdf), shown here:

barrettfeatherpractice1  (right click to download this pdf file)

practice sheet 1 by Carla Barrett

practice sheet 1 by Carla Barrett

Directions: Print out 5-10 copies of the handout, and trace over all gray lines.  Next practice in the spaces provided.  This practice sheet covers drawing a freehand feather, feathering a simple spine, a curved spine, filling a space with feathers, and turning a corner while feathering.

This is a first post in a series for improving feather technique.  If you like it, and want to encourage me to write more, please leave a message below.  Thanks, Carla Barrett

Inktense Fabric Paint Tutorial

Santa brought me a large pack of Inktense pencils by Derwent, so I decided to stitch a block design using my new IQ, and then paint it.  This is a work in progress (WIP), but I thought I would share a tutorial.

What you need:

Inktense set of pencils (comes in different sized packs.  I own a 36 set and a 24 set)

Small fabric brushes (bought at Michaels.  Read the label as it will say it is used on fabric)

Stitched quilted fabric design (I used a digital design by Karen McTavish, but you could stitch a stencil or any design.)

Fabric or Textile medium- I used 2 types on the sample- Aloe Vera gel and Liquidtex Fabric Medium diluted 50/50% with water (see baby jar in photo above).  Jo Sonja also makes a fabulous medium for use on fabric, some with added sheen.  (Google “Jo Sonya” to buy online).

Pencil sharpener

_________________________________   Let’s Begin!

Step One:  Stitch your fabric first.  This is a quilted project, so use any high quality fabric.  I used whatever I had on hand.  For the design portion, you may use any design available- either hand-drawn, digitized or a stencil.  My sample uses a Karen McTavish design stitched out on my A1 brand of longarm quilting machine using an Intelliquilter (IQ).

Step Two: Using your diluted fabric/textile medium or aloe vera gel, carefully saturate the quilted fabric design where you plan to paint.  I discovered through trial and error that the diluted fabric medium worked best and dried less stiff than either the full strength fabric medium or the aloe vera gel.  Use what works best for you.

Step Three:  While your quilted fabric area is wet, carefully color in using the Inktense pencils.  I used 2-3 colors on my sample.

Step Four:  Last step, you dip your brush in the diluted fabric/textile medium and carefully blend the Inktense colors.  Go slow, and strive for accuracy.  Once dry, the Inktense is permanent, according to the manufacturer.  In the future, I plan to test this by washing and drying a test sample, then comparing to my control sample.

That’s all you do!  Very easy, beginner project.  Here is the finished piece:

This is just a test sample, so I think I will keep it green/white, then frame it for my studio.  In the future, one of my goals is to do a wholecloth quilt design.

Final Note:  In the spirit of giving credit where credit is due, the first artist to color a quilt (that I am aware of) is Helen Stubbings from Australia.  Helen has been most generous to share her Colorque technique with others, many who now show and teach across the US.  You can purchase Helen’s book from Amazon here.

Another shout out to Sherry Rogers-Harrison, who uses a variety of products in her Inklique work to color quilts.  I hope you will visit both websites if you have enjoyed my free tutorial.

Regards, Carla

Two Scarves

I am in a scarf creative frame of mind lately.  The first one is a scarf created in the Pixeladies Fabric Design with Photoshop Elements Online Class.  I started with a sunset view image looking out my front door, taken from this perspective:

, then, using techniques taught in the class, I created this scarf:

The font words relate to how I feel about my DH, Joe and our home.  I plan to tweak it just a bit more, then have it printed out in silk.

Interested in taking this class the next time it is offered?  Just leave a comment to be added to my online class interest list.

Freeform Crochet Scarf

My next scarf uses a lovely palette of colors and textures.  The technique used is freeform crochet and I happen to have a free tutorial HERE.  This scarf is about halfway done, and I plan to wear it this winter:

Won’t this look lovely when finished?  Stay creative!  Carla

Fabric Scrap Tutorials

I decided to search the web to find fun and interesting projects or tutorials to do with fabric scraps, strips or leftover fabric from other projects including this fun one called Bunny Bowling by thelongthread.  Bowling with Bunnies?  What a fun idea!

Misc. Fabric Items Tutorials:

Inchie Tutorial by Feathered Fibers

Fabric Chain by Moda

Microwave Potato Bag by Feathered Fibers

Blossom Pincushion by Running with Scissors

Selvage Quilt Tutorial

Garden Fabric Crafts Tutorials:

Fabric Flowers Tutorial by Simply Vintage

Garden Flower Tutorial from Sewritzytitzy blog.

Fabric Scraps into Jewelry Tutorials:

Puppy Necklace by Hillary Lang

Fabric Flower Brooch by Gonetoearth blog.

Fabric Bead Necklace Tutorial by Froo Gal

Fabric Strip + chain= cool necklace! by Love, Meaghan

Bead & Knot Necklace by See Kate Sew

Fabric Embellishments Tutorials:

Yo-yo Heart by GonetoEarth

Fabric Scraps Wearable Fashion Tutorials:

Fabric Crochet Purse by Feathered Fibers

crochet purse


Rose Petal Tee by Jennifer Causey


Fabric Flower Pin by Amelia Strader

Crazy Bag by mad quilter

Fabric Scrap Applique Belt by BH&G

Fabric Rosette Cuff by see kate sew

Fabric Scraps Toys Tutorials:

Puppy Necklace by Hillary Lang

Fabric Nesting Dolls by madebyjoel

Balloon cover by mad quilter

Babooshka Doll by mad quilter

Bunny Bowling by the longthread

Angry Bird Plush Toy by Obsessively Stitiching

Angry Bird Pig by Obsessively Stitching

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I hope you will check out these tutorials if you have some free time on your hands.  One of them is sure to catch your fancy!  Happy New Year!  Carla

Carla’s Bedside Organizer Tutorial

My latest free tutorial, a handy bedside organizer, is both  functional and attractive.  I designed this to hold my glasses, my ipad,  phone, TV remote, water  and/or other items that I need close at hand.  Here is my bedside organizer, hanging in place on the side of my bed:

To help you visualize this project, here is a sketch:

For this project, I simply dug in my stash until I found some old flannel, about 3/4-1 yard.  Then I needed a matching smaller piece of fabric (12″x16″) to use as the front pockets.  As an option, you could also substitute quilted fabric in place of the flannel.

Besides the 2 fabrics, you need thread, your sewing machine, rotary mat, cutter and ruler.  Here are the supply list sized to be printed out for your convenience:

Directions are pretty straightforward.  Again, I wrote the directions and sized it to be printed out:

This is a fast project, I made it in less than an hour.  I actually love that it is now hanging on the side of my bed and allows me extra space to store my books, nick-knacks, etc.  Here is a picture I took just before I tucked it between my mattress ad box spring:

As always, if you make one using my free tutorial, please send me a comment or picture.  Happy New Year!!  Carla

Angel Bead Tutorial

Here is an easy tutorial for bead lovers, including new beaders.   I made all three bead angels in less than 10 minutes.  You can find all the supplies at ArtBeads.com:

Supplies:

Bead Caps in either silver, copper or bronze;

2 inch sterling silver head pin;

Sterling Silver curved tube bead with ring;

Angel wings in either silver, copper or brass

6 mm Spacer bead in silver, copper or brass for halo

4mm and 6 mm Swarovski Crystal bicone for head and inside the cone, or;

Variety of 4-6 mm pearls to use for head or at the bottom inside the cone;

Tools:

Round Nose Pliers; and

Wire Cutter

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Instructions:  Let’s begin!  Lay out all your supplies and decide what metals you wish to combine for your angel.  Once you have laid them out, simply place them on the sterling silver head pin in this order:

This illustration also shows you the order of what goes where:

Once you have done this, your next decision has to do with whether you want a long wire or a short one to dangle it from your necklace (or pin, bookmark, etc).  Notice the varying lengths of wire in this photo:

What you plan to do with the angel dictates how long or short you have your wire.

On this bead angel,  I have left the wire long since I haven’t yet decided what I will do with it.  This is a good tip if you are making them as presents.

In bead angel 2, shown below,  I have cut the wire shorter.  This angel, I plan to dangle off of a metal bookmark.  I do have a free Bookmark Tutorial if you want to make your own.

This angel would look great combined with one of my metal bookmarks:

Additionally, you can buy a pre-made bookmark, too, from ArtBeads.com or at your local bead store.

Next picture, notice that Bead Angel 3 has the shortest wire showing of all three angels:

Instead, I used the round nose pliers to make a built-in “eye” or loop ring to attach to the silver curved tube bead ring, shown just above the angel.  If you do not know how to do this, please watch and follow this video on making loops with wire.  Now, to finish this gift, all I have to do is add a necklace and I am done.

I made a necklace for Ramona, my DMIL as a gift.  She called and told me that all her friends at her church loved it.  This necklace makes a wonderful, one-of-a-kind gift for friends and family.

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Remember, you can substitute any supplies you have on hand already.  Here is a lovely angel made by Kathy Jasper.  She made this after I posted my illustration above the other day.  Notice how by using different materials, you get a unique look:

If you enjoy and use this tutorial, please drop me a comment or message like Kathy did.   Thanks to Kathy for sharing her angel, btw!

I have a large number of free tutorials besides this one.  My tutorials cover a wide variety of arts and crafts, too.  I have a Tutorial button at the top of this page just above my Blog Header illustration if you wish to visit.  In the meantime, enjoy the Holiday Season!!  Hugs, Carla